Pumpkin Puree

It is that time of year again. Pumpkins are being used in everything. Most people find using the canned stuff easier. I used to until I learned a secret….If you are eating the canned stuff, you may not actually be eating pumpkins. Here is the FDA’s official definition for canned pumpkins: “The canned product prepared from clean, sound, properly matured, golden fleshed, firm shelled, sweet varieties of either pumpkins and squashes by washing, stemming, cutting, steaming and reducing to a pulp.” Nice huh? All this because the line between the two (pumpkins and squashes) is somewhat blurred. Some puree is actually one or more kinds of winter squash. Cucurbita pepo  is commonly referred to as pumpkins (most often is jack O’ lantern pumpkins), Cucurbita maxima is commonly referred to as Hubbard and Boston Marrow squashes, and Curcurbita.

Here is the FDA’s official definition for canned pumpkins: “The canned product prepared from clean, sound, properly matured, golden fleshed, firm shelled, sweet varieties of either pumpkins and squashes by washing, stemming, cutting, steaming and reducing to a pulp.” Nice huh? All this because the line between the two (pumpkins and squashes) is somewhat blurred. Some puree is actually one or more kinds of winter squash. Cucurbita pepo  is commonly referred to as pumpkins (most often is jack O’ lantern pumpkins), Cucurbita maxima is commonly referred to as Hubbard and Boston Marrow squashes, and Curcurbita.

“The canned product prepared from clean, sound, properly matured, golden fleshed, firm shelled, sweet varieties of either pumpkins and squashes by washing, stemming, cutting, steaming and reducing to a pulp.”

Nice huh? All this because the line between the two (pumpkins and squashes) is somewhat blurred. Some puree is actually one or more kinds of winter squash. Cucurbita pepo  is commonly referred to as pumpkins (most often is jack O’ lantern pumpkins), Cucurbita maxima is commonly referred to as Hubbard and Boston Marrow squashes, and Curcurbita moschasta is commonly referred to as butternut squash, as well as Dickinson pumpkins.

I have a ton of leftover mini baking pumpkins from Halloween that were begging me to use them. Since Thanksgiving is coming up, I decided today was the perfect day.

I was having issues with one of the pumpkins. I could not get a knife in it to cut it in half. After about 10 minutes of me trying, I called in for reinforcement (my Hubby). I currently have a cyst on my wrist that is really getting on my last freaking nerve. It is making certain things very hard for me to do. When he could not get a knife through it after several attempts, he grabbed a hatchet that he uses for chopping firewood and went to town on the pumpkins.  Needless to say, he was proud of himself. After all, he could not allow the pumpkin to get the best of him and I got to clean all the pumpkins for a second time.

Supply List:

Baking pumpkins of your choice

Cutting board

Knife

Baking dish or a roaster

Bowl for the seeds(optional)

Food processor

Directions:

Cut the pumpkins in half.

Remove the seeds and the pulp. Save if you are planning on roasting the seeds.

Place the pumpkin halves face down in the baking dish or roaster.

Bake at 400 (about 30-40 minutes) until done.
NOTE: Some pumpkins you will be able to spear a fork through the skin to tell they are done. Other pumpkins will actually separate or can easily be pried apart from the skin when picked up.

I put the pumpkin pulp in the food processor and blend until pureed.

No need for special conversions or anything.

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